Bad Boy 1976 Toyota FJ40 Could Take on Broncos and Wranglers All Day Long

For off-road lovers, 2020 will go down in history as the year when the Bronco nameplate came back, this time with much higher aspirations. The segment was shaken to its core by the arrival of the Ford family of bad boys, then cooled down a bit, in anticipation of the market launch of the model.
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1976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ401976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40
The Bronco promises crazy hardware and insane capabilities, so one would be inclined to think not even a Wrangler can stand up to it. But how about a decades-old Toyota?

The Japanese have been playing in this segment since forever. One of their most famous nameplates in the battle of the off-roaders is the Land Cruiser born all the way back in the 1960s. The early ones, like the FJ40 from 1976 we have here, have been instant hits, and are still doing the rounds on the pre-owned market.

Well, not quite like the FJ40 we have here, as we doubt there’s another built the same way. Completely restored and repaired with Toyota parts, it now looks not only better than the brand new Bronco (to these eyes at least), but also willing to take it on anytime off the beaten path.

Sporting the original 2F engine, 4-speed transmission, transfer case, and differentials, the truck has brand new cooling and fuel systems. Up front we get a differential with ARB air lockers, while the rear is gifted with a Detroit locker.

The body of the Land Cruiser meets the ground courtesy of massive, rugged Maxxis Trepador tires. With a ground clearance that is sure to make short work of any obstacle, the FJ is fully equipped for the worst scenario, with a roll cage in the bed, a mean-looking bull bar up front, and a spartan interior that looks both comfortable and utilitarian.

The truck has been used for under 10,000 miles since restoration (16,000 km), and it is selling for far more than a brand new Bronco or Wrangler: $46,900.

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